kantoor2 – out now!

 

Dubbing process is still going on, but the first copies are ready to go. The kantoor series are dedicated to found sounds. Copied on a found C90, the release comes with a zine. Petrichor publishers in Deventer took care of the zine.

The sounds on the tape were found and assembled by Marcin Barski (Poland) Kristoffer Raasted ( Danmark) Roman Voronovsky ( Russia ) and Mark Vernon ( Scotland ). All four of them also provided text, collage and pictures for the zine. Additional texts were written by Giada dalla Bontà and Rinus Van Alebeek.

More info will follow soon.


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Tape Run

Like modern day archeology, from the depths of our shared heritage some copies of various tape runs resurfaced, all untouched and still in their original package.

The tapes were dubbed and assembled at home, all are chrome quality.

The tapes are available at the Underbelly distro in Rotterdam, also on-line.

 

tape runs

Montreal Tape Run was released in collaboration with crustacés tapes from Montreal. This is the staaltape version. Link MTR

In the picture you also see the tourist editions of Paris Tape Run 1 + 2 and Berlin Tape Run 1.

Link PTR1 Link PTR2 Link BTR1

 

Out Now! Dai Coelacanth – A condemned debtor does not recognise the Horse

dai2

raw poetry, raw street recordings, raw cuts, lo-fi recorder, re-used commercial tape, sci-fi images, it all blends together in a 2×15 minutes mix. Beautiful? Let’s write that word on the mirror for other people to forget. This tape is not about beauty. This tape is full of scars. Let’s hope they don’t hurt anymore. But if they do, then please come in and listen. You might forget about the pain for a little while.

get the C30 at the on-line shop

A condemned debtor does not recognise the Horse by Dai Coelacanth

shipping out

Four copies of ‘Dear Concerned Employees, ‘two copies of ‘Let me help you get rid of this,‘ one copy of ‘kantoor‘, one copy of ‘Paris Tape Run -home version‘ and one copy of ‘Audiozine#3 – Valerie Kuehne‘ have been shipped to Kraków, Rockville, London and New York City.

This is how they were packed.

nvlp4nvlp3nvlp2envlp1

Review of Kylie 1 and June Crawford’s What that says about me

Ed Pinsent always writes a longer essay on staaltape releases.

Two quotes,

Kylie 1: “these tapes are great fun to listen to,”

June’s release: “This is a profoundly touching item and it stayed with me for some hours after hearing it.”

Read the complete review on Ed’s The Sound Projector.

Review of Dear Concerned Employees and Kantoor

Published on No-Wave, written by Andrew O’Keefe

Staaltape’s releases deliberately engineer a personal experience. Handmade packaging, which must be destroyed to be opened, and messages both personal and cryptic, adorn their tapes. Before even putting the tape into the deck, there is a suggestion to savour the moment; be attentive, and be present. In an age of streaming, Staaltape’s presentation attempts to re-teach the value of pricked ears.

The tapes themselves are unique enough to fit the bill. Dear Concerned Employees rises from a murky bog of lo-fi noise, shifting into warped, muzak-style sketches; mutated and muggy pop hits, and some spoken word passages whose words are indefinable.

The tape never takes form, but never feels insubstantial. Instead, it offers a feeling of something bubbling under the surface, a sort of paranoid energy which carries its quieter moments through effortlessly.

The tape’s aim: to calm the nerves of employees of the Duke Energy Building, who found a strange package in late 2018. The package later turned out to be a Journey cassette. While sending a tape to these people might seem arch, the letter accompanying ‘Dear Concerned Employees’ clarifies its intent.

“Not so long ago a tape brought a message of fear…this tape should transmit a message of hope and care.”

kantoor

Also released on Staaltape is Kantoor, a tape and accompanying zine. The zine, which draws on an array of contributors is by turns informative, allusory, poetic and humorous. Each contributor to the tape attempts either to explain or complement their section of audio. Some attractive context is added to content which otherwise may require knowledge of a fair few languages.

There is enough content here to carry through even the most staunch single-language listeners, though. We open on a cockerel, and some mysterious bowls and chimes, and this mystery is a throughrun of the tape. Even the speech itself is fascinating to listen to, shrouded in format-fog. And it never seems to run on very long before music interrupts.

The sounds are drawn from a wide pool of sources — some immediately recognisable, some mystical, vague and puzzling. Their incorporation feels invariably natural. We are treated to choirs, solo vocalists, the sounds of vehicles, animals, instruments. All combined to suggest a vast world in constant motion.

Kantoor has that unsettling, ghostly quality that appealed to, and was repurposed by, the likes of Boards of Canada. It even features some eerie analogue synthesiser work. Its sounds have more clarity than those on Dear Concerned Employees, but no less intrigue.

These packages feel delightful, unique and homegrown. The urge to track down all their samples and sources is irresistible. But they stand alone, too, woven lovingly together into coherent, fascinating wholes.

Dear Concerned Employees and Kantoor are available at the staaltape shop